Audio Presentation

FAQ

faqOver the years, we have found that many of our patients frequently have questions or concerns about their dental care.  We would like to take a moment to try to provide you with the most frequently asked questions that we receive in hopes that it might provide you with some useful information to some questions you might have about your dental health.  If you have additonal questions that are not covered here, please call one of our professional staff members, who will be more than happy to provide you with as much information as you desire.

 

  1. How does the doctor, and his current staff, keep up to date on changing technology and materials to provide me with the best overall care possible?
  1. How will I know when I need to come in for my routine exam and checkup?
  1. At what age should my children see a dentist?  Do you provide dental care for children or should I see a special pediatric dentist?
  1. My child has experienced an accident and knocked one of their teeth completely out.  What should I do?
  1. I have a temporary crown in my mouth; what do I do should it come loose or come completely out?
  1. What payment options do you provide?
  1. I see people with extremely white teeth, how can I safely and effectively whiten my teeth?
  1. My gums tend to bleed after I brush my teeth, is this something I should be concerend about?  And is it really necessary that I floss my teeth?
  1. What is the proper technique for brushing my teeth?  What is the proper technique for flossing?
  1. I’ve just left your office after an extraction; what if anything should I be doing with the extraction site to ensure it’s properly cleaned and prevent infection?

 

How does the doctor, and his current staff, keep up to date on changing technology and materials to provide me with the best overall care possible?

Many hours go into continuing education both for Dr. Reynolds, as well as the rest of his staff to ensure that our patients are receiving the best quality dental care we can provide. Our staff spends numerous hours learning how to improve our clinical care, as well as our customer service experience.

back to top

How will I know when I need to come in for my routine exam and checkup?

Our staff uses several methods to ensure that you never miss a scheduled exam. Dr. Reynolds and his staff recommend that you see us twice a year for your regularly scheduled comprehensive checkup and hygiene exam. To ensure you meet those scheduled exams, we have equipped ourselves with a state of the art computer system that will alert us well in advance of your next scheduled appointment. At that time, we’ll either send you an appointment card alerting you to call our office to schedule an apointment, or a member of our staff will contact you via telephone to try to schedule an appointment. We also try to schedule your next appointment at your prior exam date. We understand your schedule is a busy one, so we use several methods to help provide you with the best scheduling information as possible.

back to top

At what age should my child see a dentist? Do you provide care for children or should I see a special pediatric dentist?

By the time your child is 6 months of age, your doctor should assess the likelihood of your child having future dental problems. If he or she thinks your child will have dental problems, be sure your child sees a dentist before his or her first birthday or 6 months after the first primary teeth appear, whichever comes first. After your first visit, schedule regular visits every 6 months or as your dentist recommends. Experts recommend that your child’s dental care start at 12 months of age. If your baby has dental problems caused by injury, disease, or a developmental problem, see a pediatric dentist right away.

At this time, we only treat children of 3 years of age or older. We recommend children under the age of 3 see a pediatric dentist who specializes in the care of younger children. If you would like the recommendation of a pediatric dentist, please call our office and we’ll refer you to a quality pediatric dentist in our area.

back to top

My child has experienced an accident and knocked one of their teeth completely out. What should I do?

If the damaged tooth was a primary tooth, don't worry. As long as you see no soft tissue or facial injury, there is no need to seek emergency dental care. The primary tooth would fall out naturally in time.

Displacement of a permanent tooth should be addressed quickly, however. Place the tooth in a small glass of milk and call our office for emergency care. We may be able to replace the tooth. We try to provide emergency care in the event of this situation, so please call our office as we have measures in place should this circumstance ever arise.

If you experience an emergency with extensive bleeding or pain, please visit your local emergency room immediately.

back to top

I have a temporary crown in my mouth, what do I do should it come loose or come completely out?

If your temporary falls out or breaks, save any remaining pieces if possible and call our office at your earliest convenience. We'll try to see you the same day if possible to replace it. In the mean time, you can visit your local pharmacy to purchase denture adhesive or dental wax. A small bit of either can temporarily secure your restoration until you can get to our office or until we can schedule you an appointment to replace it for you.

back to top

What payment options do you provide?

We accept cash, check, ATM card, and most major credit cards, as well as some third party payment plans. For complete details on all of our payment options, please see our Financing section for more information or contact us at our office for further information.

back to top

I see people with extremely white teeth, how can I safely and effectively whiten my teeth?

Many teeth whitening systems are available, including whitening toothpastes, over-the counter gels, rinses, strips and trays, and whitening agents obtained from a dentist.

Teeth whitening is ideal for people who have healthy, unrestored teeth (no fillings) and gums. Individuals with yellow tones to their teeth respond best. But this cosmetic procedure is not recommended for everyone.

As a practice, we prefer to use the Opalescence whitening system. This is a do-it-yourself, take home whitening system that can be done at your convenience. If you are interested in this option, please consult one of our staff members and we’ll be hapy to discuss this with you.

back to top

My gums bleed after I brush my teeth, is this something I should be concerned about? Is it really necessary that I floss my teeth?

Bleeding gums could indicate periodontal disease, a condition that causes tooth loosening, tooth loss, gum recession and deterioration, and increased risk of stroke and heart attack. Learn more about gum disease and how the we can help you arrest and reverse this condition by visiting our Services page. We’ll also be happy to discuss this with you in person at your next scheduled visit.

Yes, it’s necessary that you floss your teeth. Flossing helps to keep plaque and tarter from building up between your teeth and gums which could lead to serious tooth and gum problems. It’s recommended that you floss each time you brush, to help cut down on any build up that could lead to periodontal disease.

back to top

What is the proper technique for brushing my teeth? What is the proper technique for flossing?

This is a very common question we see from patients who are concerned they aren’t getting their teeth as clean as they would like. The ADHA has the following information on their site for both brushing and flossing (http://www.adha.org/oralhealth/index.html):

Brushing:
Place bristles along the gumline at a 45-degree angle. Bristles should contact both the tooth surface and the gumline. Gently brush the outer tooth surfaces of 2-3 teeth using a vibrating back & forth rolling motion. Move brush to the next group of 2-3 teeth and repeat. Maintain a 45-degree angle with bristles contacting the tooth surface and gumline. Gently brush using back, forth, and rolling motion along all of the inner tooth surfaces. Tilt brush vertically behind the front teeth. Make several up & down strokes using the front half of the brush. Place the brush against the biting surface of the teeth & use a gentle back & forth scrubbing motion. Brush the tongue from back to front to remove odor-producing bacteria.

Flossing:
Wind 18" of floss around middle fingers of each hand. Pinch floss between thumbs and index fingers, leaving a 1"- 2" length in between. Use thumbs to direct floss between upper teeth. Keep a 1" - 2" length of floss taut between fingers. Use index fingers to guide floss between contacts of the lower teeth. Gently guide floss between the teeth by using a zig-zag motion. DO NOT SNAP FLOSS BETWEEN YOUR TEETH. Contour floss around the side of the tooth. Slide floss up and down against the tooth surface and under the gumline. Floss each tooth thoroughly with a clean section of floss.

back to top

I’ve just left your office after an extraction, what if anything should I be doing with the extraction site to ensure it’s properly cleaned and prevent infection?

back to top